Archives

  • Identity: Shifting Sands of the Becoming of a Coach
    Vol. 1 No. 9 (2024)

    Abstract

    Adults arrive with a defined personal identity, with a professional identity forming as they engage in vocational–professional skill and knowledge acquisition. Questioning and processing to understand who they are, who they are becoming and who they wish to become both professionally and personally (e.g. Livingston & Griffin, 2019). Based on the original research ‘On Becoming a Coach’ (Rajasinghe, et al., (2022), this paper explores two sub-themes (i.e., ordinate) ‘identity’ and ‘self-concept’; how they interplay and influence shifts identified by experienced coaches. The research explored how experienced coaches made sense of their developmental experiences as they became a coach of experience. The primary (i.e., superordinate) themes identified in this research are; Vehicles of Development, Narratives of Awareness, Narratives of Letting Go, Ethical Practice & Narratives of becoming a Coach. Self-concept and identity are formed from childhood imposed and subsequent adult-formed values and assumptions and understanding of oneself in various societal roles (Harter, 2012). As life experiences are processed these beliefs, values, assumptions are evaluated and adjusted through the lens of increased complex cognitive capacity (e.g. Erikson, 1959), people describe themselves across multiple social roles (for example mother, grandparent, CEO, student, divorcee, etc; Harter, Bresnick, Bouchey, & Whitesell,.1997) and integrate cultural experiences (Markus, H. R., & Kitayama, S. (1991). These shifts influence a coach's self-concept and identity, and a coach’s ethical acuity and practice. It is expected that such shifts impact the coaching. Finally, I outline the psychological risks and ethical implications of coaching during significant identity shifts.

  • Supply and Demand in the Development of Coaching Professional Ethics
    Vol. 1 No. 3 (2024)

    Presented at Ethics the Heart of Coaching: Expanding the Boundaries of Ethical Thinking & Practice

    Virtual Conference: www.coachingethicsforum.com

    Hosted by the Coaching Ethics Forum,

    8 & 9 December, 2023

    Abstract: While all business and service providers should be guided by general ethical obligations, some—professions—possess special ethical codes, supported and/or enforced by professional associations. How do professions differ from other service providers, such that their services both require, and can deliver, high ethical standards? Previous research has explored the development of professional ethics through an examination of demand-side factors (the various stakeholders whose needs drive them to demand high ethical standards of service providers) and supply-side factors (the motivational structures that empower service providers to conscientiously live up to those high ethical standards). This paper applies this framework to explore the need for special ethical standards for coaches, and the social and psychological resources coaches have for delivering on those standards.

  • Cyber Citizenship: Navigating the Digital Landscape Coaching
    Vol. 1 No. 5 (2024)

    Presented at Ethics the Heart of Coaching: Expanding the Boundaries of Ethical Thinking & Practice

    Virtual Conference: www.coachingethicsforum.com

    Hosted by the Coaching Ethics Forum,

    8 & 9 December, 2023

    Abstract: The coaching industry is evolving towards unprecedented access, scale, and globalization. The rise of digital coaching greatly enables this transformation but also requires adaptation of traditional coaching models. This panel discussion explored the construct of “cyber citizenship” in coaching, defined by three pillars: digital literacy, global civics, and cybersecurity. Within digital literacy, we explore the importance of knowing how to digest information, sort fiction from fact, learn about the development of new technologies (e.g. artificial intelligence and machine learning) and adapt one’s skills to the digital landscape. Within global civics, the discussion focused on the importance of establishing and nurturing trust in a culturally competent way with clients in the digital realm. The session ended with a discussion of cybersecurity best practices to safeguard sensitive client information and protect both the coach and the client from potential online threats. This session aimed to empower coaches to navigate the digital landscape with integrity, gain awareness of the threats and opportunities, and ultimately, foster a safe and effective digital coaching environment for all.

  • Navigating the Moral Compass: Ethical Dimensions in Coach Education
    Vol. 1 No. 7 (2024)

    Presented at Ethics the Heart of Coaching: Expanding the Boundaries of Ethical Thinking & Practice

    Virtual Conference: www.coachingethicsforum.com

    Hosted by the Coaching Ethics Forum

    8 & 9 December, 2023

    Abstract: This paper critically examines the ethical dimensions and challenges in assessment within coach education, emphasizing the heutagogical approach and the critical role of learner-centred assessment. We explored the complex interplay between different assessment methods - norm-referenced, criteria-referenced, and ipsative - and their ethical implications in the context of varying institutional, programmatic, and individual learner demands. Central to this exploration is the ethical dilemma faced by educators in balancing these competing needs and determining what constitutes 'right' in the domain of assessment. The over-emphasis on the assessment of learning is scrutinized, particularly its focus on meeting predefined standards and competencies through “objective” evaluation. In contrast, assessment for learning is presented as a formative approach that provides continuous insights into the learners' development, enabling educators to tailor their teaching strategies. When educators assess their students' learning, they have a window into the effectiveness of their teaching. The authors endorse the stance that considers assessment as learning, an approach that actively engages learners through self-reflection, goal setting, and direct observation, emphasizing the learning process as part of the outcome.

  • JoCE - V1(1) Editorial

    Ethics Unveiled: Pioneering a Global Conversation in Coaching Ethics
    Vol. 1 No. 2 (2024)

    WELCOME, readers, to the first edition of the Journal of Coaching Ethics (JoCE). To begin this journey let us look to where the unveiling of ethics globally all began. Early in the year 2021, with some insistence on my part David Clutterbuck and I decided to bring together a group of leading academics, representatives from coaching bodies and leading coaches from across the globe[1]. We aimed to ignite a conversation about elevating ethical thinking, fostering ethical conversations, and promoting ethical decision-making in coaching. So, from that virtual meeting late Wednesday night – early Thursday morning for some and early Wednesday morning for others April 2021, the seeds of a global conversation were planted, blossoming into a series of groundbreaking conferences and, ultimately, the birth of JoCE in 2023.

  • Power, Gender, Leadership, and Change: Ethical Implications for Coaching
    Vol. 1 No. 8 (2024)

    Presented at Ethics the Heart of Coaching: Expanding the Boundaries of Ethical Thinking & Practice

    Virtual Conference: www.coachingethicsforum.com

    Hosted by the Coaching Ethics Forum

    8 & 9 December, 2023

     

    Abstract: This paper offers an exploration of the ethical implications surrounding power, gender, leadership, and change in leadership and coaching. This exploration delves into the dynamics of oppressive power structures with a specific focus on gender dynamics and their profound impact on our personal and professional lives. Through the lens of Shoukry’s Emancipatory Coaching framework (2016), we offer a strategy that can enable coaches to inspire transformative change within themselves and for their clients in the spirit of creating inclusive, safe, and equitable environments. The goal is to incite dialogue and reflection around what it means to shape a renewed commitment and approach to coaching in the context of today’s social challenges in a way that also drives positive social change.

  • Phronesis (Practical Wisdom) as the Key to Professional Ethics in Coaching
    Vol. 1 No. 4 (2024)

    Presented at Ethics the Heart of Coaching: Expanding the Boundaries of Ethical Thinking & Practice

    Virtual Conference: www.coachingethicsforum.com

    Hosted by the Coaching Ethics Forum,

    8 & 9 December, 2023

    Abstract: I understand coaching as a multi-faceted profession; and the theoretical assumption undergirding this short paper is that the professional ethics of coaching is best grounded in a general virtue ethical approach to the professional ethics, centered around the ideal of phronesis (practical wisdom) in an Aristotelian sense. For Aristotle (1985), we seek evidence not only in the theories of “the wise” but also the views of “the many.” I would thus be inclined to ground a virtue ethical approach to coaching empirically in the extensive research already conducted at the Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues into various professionals, and to ground it theoretically in recent efforts to revive an Aristotelian concept of phronesis as excellence in ethical decision-making (see further in Kristjánsson, 2024).

  • Enriching coaching ethics with philosophical ethics and interculturalism
    Vol. 1 No. 6 (2024)

    Presented at Ethics the Heart of Coaching: Expanding the Boundaries of Ethical Thinking & Practice

    Virtual Conference: www.coachingethicsforum.com

    Hosted by the Coaching Ethics Forum,

    8 & 9 December, 2023

    Abstract: While recognizing that current coaching codes of ethics offer useful guidance, this article calls for a deeper ethical reflection in the face of planetary challenges. It advocates for the integration of philosophical ethics and interculturalism, encouraging coaches to challenge assumptions and broaden their perspectives. The exploration includes deontological and teleological ethical theories, referring notably to the pioneering contributions of Immanuel Kant, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, and Aristotle. This article argues that coaching cannot be ethical without being engaged toward sustainable development (spelled out in the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals). Furthermore, it introduces intercultural coaching, proposing the Cultural Orientations Framework (COF) to navigate cultural variations, which are often ignored in current coaching ethics. Ultimately, it asserts that a comprehensive approach, incorporating diverse ethical perspectives and cultural considerations, and a commitment to sustainability, is crucial for ethical coaching in today's complex and turbulent world.

  • Journal of Coaching Ethics: Cover
    Vol. 1 No. 1 (2024)

    JoCE Cover 

     

    Boomerangs + white and blue + colourful = Australia its vibrancy my native home

    Red, white = Malta, my native cultural home
    Red, White, Blue = France, my home when founding the journal

    Red = ethics are the beating heart of everything we do across all domains of life, and specifically for this Journal the field of coaching

    Messy, interwoven, colourful fluidity = that is Ethics

    Wendy-Ann Smith

    Founding Editor